Nature Notes

Dragonfly Days

Down in the tranquil Dayton Wildflower Garden, a peaceful path of blooming Canadian Anemones sway in the much needed breeze like the graceful hands of an orchestra conductor.

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By Lee Anne Laskey

Dragonflies are my walking companions today as I set out to explore in the sun and shade. This week there are highlights to experience in both, so come on out!

I was drawn into the Sweatt Entry Terrace right away by the sweet scent of the Mock Orange, to the shady bench under the graceful Wisteria vine. It was so refreshing to watch visitors enjoy the newly opened cafe again, with its colorful planters, lively chipmunks and birdsong.

Canadian Anemone bloom

On the MacMillan Terrace nearby, cheery Peonies paint the patio and the Kentucky Coffee Tree gives needed shade. It is a favorite tree of mine, since it gives us unique beauty in all of our Minnesota seasons.

Morden Blush shrub rose

Over in the Wilson Rose Garden, the shrub roses are showing off their quiet beauty as families relax together in the shady gazebo. This particular peachy pink variety of rose is lightly fragranced & popular for bouquets.

Sarah Bernhardt Chinese Peony

Down in the tranquil Dayton Wildflower Garden, a peaceful path of blooming Canadian Anemones sway in the much needed breeze like the graceful hands of an orchestra conductor.

Wisteria

Over in the open prairie, the striking spikes of pure white baptisia blooms dot the landscape while the Large Flowered Penstemon show-off its beauty by the water features. The wichety-wichety-wichety of the male Common Yellowthroats make me smile. It is something we can always count on hearing here this time of year.  

Baptisia

I am craving a relief from the heat now. The Pine Walk is perfect for escaping under the warm scented branches. I slowed down to enjoy nature’s artwork in the bark of the Japanese Red Pine and Swiss Stone cones. A dragonfly prepared for take-off on a runway branch in front of me.

Twelve-spotted skimmer dragonfly

Last, I made my way to the Wurtele Boardwalk to get a possible final peak at the lady’s slipper blooms and enjoy the emerging slender stalks of the native Marsh Bellflower. It’s a relaxing way to end the walk.

March Bellflower

I listened to the Red-winged blackbirds cheery calls before heading to my car and watched the males perched on the cattails singing their hearts out.  Females use the cattails as part of their sturdy nests.  I can always count on the sound of them to welcome the warm season ahead.

What familiar signs of the season will you enjoy here this week? 

Lee Anne Laskey is a Minnesota Master Naturalist Volunteer.

5 comments on “Dragonfly Days

  1. Helen Malby

    Is it possible that some of these photos were mislabeled?

  2. Carol Frey

    The picture was not a shrub rose, but it was a peony.

  3. Yay Lee Anne! 👏💚

  4. Pingback: Arb Links, vol. 48 | News from the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum

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